Swing tip: A simple way to curve the golf ball

By Mike Davis, PGA, Contributor

All golfers, even beginners, should learn to intentionally hit some curves with their full swing. Top players can hit hooks and slices by manipulating their wrists and hands through impact; this takes a pretty high level of skill.

Full Swing
Are you able to intentionally hit some curves with your full swing?
Full Swing

I want to suggest that you try another method that is easier to control and should also help you to find a better golf swing.

Sidespin is created when the clubface and the path don't line up at impact. A hook results from an inside-out path with a closed clubface and a slice comes from outside-in with an open face.

I recommend that you adjust three set-up elements and that your swing should stay the same.

For a slice:

1. Tilt your spine toward the target so your head is closer to the target than your belt buckle. Since your swing should move around your spine, this will create an outside-in path.

2. Move the ball position slightly forward in your stance, since an outside-in path will bottom out farther forward.

3. Change the grip location in your hands so the clubface is more open relative to the target line and your hands.

For a hook:

1. Tilt your spine away from the target so your head is farther away from the target than your belt buckle. Since your swing should move around your spine, this will create an inside-out path.

2. Move the ball position slightly back in your stance, since an inside-out path will bottom out farther back.

3. Change the grip location in your hands so the clubface is more closed relative to the target line and your hands.

In each case you should feel that your torso rotates around your spine and your arms swing around your body. There should be no need for manipulation with your hands through impact, unless that is a need for an extreme curve.

Anyone who fights a curve (either a slice or hook) with their normal swing should benefit from this adjustment in posture and grip to create the opposite type of shot.

Mike Davis, PGAMike Davis, PGA, Contributor

Mike Davis is a PGA Master Professional and has been honored as a GOLF Magazine Top 100 Teacher. He has been chosen Instructor of the Year 13 times by different PGA Chapters and Sections. An expert in video golf instruction, Davis has been honored by the World Scientific Congress of Golf for his research.


 
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