A better grip on the club means a better golf swing

By Bob Byman, Special Contributor

The golf swing is a motion. Being such, it must be performed relative to simple laws of physics - namely centrifugal force and inertia. If you want to take full advantage of these forces, then the system in which you perform the swing must be in balance. The better the system is in balance, the greater the potential of controlling the outcome.

Golf Swing - Grip
If your grip is weak with one hand, the golf course just cannot be wide enough for you.
Golf Swing - Grip

Almost all of the in-swing positions that are currently so studiously taught by golf instructors these days tend to naturally happen if the grip is on correctly and then it stays on, in the exact same form, throughout the entire movement. Almost all of these positions are involuntary, meaning they happen naturally. There are a few voluntary actions and movements that must be learned, but these are immeasurably easier to learn with a proper grip and nearly impossible to learn if your grip is improper. A grip that has one or both hands turned either to the right or left of neutral dictates that the player must compensate with something to try to bring the golf club in squarely.

For example, if your grip is strong (for a right-handed golfer, either one or both hands are turned to the right of neutral with neither hand in a weak position), then it dictates that the hands have to be more forward of the clubhead at impact, than normal, and encourage the path to come down from way inside the correct line to come in with a square blade. This will almost always narrow the arc, to some degree, down near the ball causing a loss of posture or dipping motion through the ball. The ball will be hit lower than normal and hitting a high shot becomes problematical. Since each and every swing should produce a hook, the advanced golfer tends to play fades with his driver and longer clubs. But under pressure, the ball always seems to be missed to the left.

For the average player, they just miss most of their shots to the left and then a few far to the right-especially after they have missed too many shots to the left or they just can't hit it to the left on a particular shot. The narrowing of the arc and consequential dipping motion through the ball puts tremendous unnatural pressure on the joints of the body - especially the lower back, left hip, left elbow and wrists. At worst, careers are shortened. At best, your body hurts.

If your grip is weak (again for the right-handed golfer, either one or both hands are turned to the left of neutral with neither hand in a strong position), then it dictates that the hands have to be less forward of the clubhead at impact (assuming you don't bow your left wrist to compensate) to come in with a square blade. This tends to widen the arc in the beginning of the unloading motion and encourage the path to come down from way outside the correct line. The ball is hit higher than normal and hitting a controlled low shot is problematical. You only see poor or inexperienced golfers with this type of grip. Every shot should be a fade or slice, so the player ends up aiming way left to accommodate their slice or aims way right to accommodate their big pull. The player gets back little for his efforts and the game is tiring and frustrating.

If your grip is weak with one hand - usually the lead hand and strong with the trailing hand, then the golf course just cannot be wide enough for you. Depending on which hand dominates in the swing the clubface can be open or closed at impact creating big slices or big hooks. Walking up the fairway is a rare event indeed for these players. They have to swing at a much reduced speed in order to attempt to keep the golf ball on the course. A very large percentage of golfers are in this category.

These are some of the reasons why I am adamant that my students get their grips correct from the beginning. I will show you exactly how to employ the absolute best grip in the world. It will transform and improve golfers' swings and games dramatically in the short term and inexorably in the long term.

Bob BymanBob Byman, Special Contributor

Bob Byman has won 12 times worldwide, including Arnold Palmer's Bay Hill Classic, and has been ranked in the top 25 players in the world three separate years. Starting in 1987, he has worked to become a world-class teacher of the golf swing and playing the game. Bob has taught all levels of golfers from beginners and juniors to PGA Tour winners.


 
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